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Construction of Pagodas

PagodaIn the Buddhist tradition, the Pagodas or Stupas are religious monuments in a shape of a conic tower, which are erected as symbols of peace and harmony and which, considered as sacred manifestations of a perfect mind, are the center of prayers and peregrinations of devotees and practitioners. For the benefit of all beings, the Pagodas also protect from the five great disasters of the war, the epidemic illness, the famine, the pollution and the poverty.
Erected in auspicious places, with an altruistic motivation and with specific designs and the right proportions, the Pagodas are built with selected materials, such stone, brick or concrete, and are painted in white, yellow and even gold color.
Among its architectonic features, it is remarkable the stone, concrete or marble platform over which they are based, around which the pilgrims make sacred circumvallation’s. On the top of this platform is erected the base of the Pagoda itself, which can be of square or octagonal design and which can have various steps. All the Pagodas have inside them, even at the base, a few sealed chambers, some of which are used as room for the meditation practice.
Over the platform is based a convex structure called Bumpa, which symbolizes the thirty one planes of existence and in which interior are put valuable objects that emanates the vital force of the body of the full Enlightened One, such as sacred texts, relics of great masters of the History or tsa-tsas, which are small molds of Pagodas which contain prayer rolls and which have been elaborated during the recitation of specific mantras.
In the Mahayana School, culminating the Pagoda is placed a conic tower, often of pyramidal style and of various levels of descendent size (normally thirteen), over which is placed a golden pinnacle in the shape of an umbrella. This is habitually crowed with a jewel that connotes the enlightenment, frequently with the shape of the moon –which symbolizes the Bodhiçitta motivation for the benefit of all beings− and the sun −which symbolizes the wisdom−. The consecration of the Pagoda culminates with its placement.
5-Ven-Milarepa-RelicAccording to the tradition, the different steps which have to be followed in the process of the construction of the Pagodas begin with the election of an auspicious day and with the blessing with prayers and pujas of the selected ground. There have to be also prepared the recipients and the objects of value that these will contain. Following certain ceremonies, these containers will be deposited inside the Pagoda, which will be finally consecrated.
Although in the world there are thousands of Pagodas, raised either in Asiatic countries, as in different countries of the West, for the Buddhist tradition, and in particular for the Vajrayana Buddhism, eight are the Pagodas or Stupas that, due to their link with the life of the Buda, have the main role. These eight Pagodas are the Blowing Lotus of the Birth of Buddha Stupa, the Enlightenment Stupa, the Turn of the Wheel of Dharma and the Many Entrances of the Auspiciousness Stupa, the Great Miracle Stupa, the Descending from the Tushita heaven Stupa, the Reunification of the Sangha Stupa, the Victory Stupa and the Paranirvana Stupa, being the latter the most common one in the Theravada Buddhism countries.

Project of Trikaya for the construction of Pagodas in the Iberian Peninsula

During 1999, the founder of Trikaya, the Saya Kunsal Kassapa, received from various of his masters at Myanmar −as the Sayadaw (religious master) Badanta Tikkha, member of the Sangha council in Asia, or the Sayadaw Kateti Vara, Abbot of the Relics Museum of Myanmar−, a large number of relics of great value, belonging to Buddha and to some of his most exemplary disciples, such as Sariputta, Mogalana or Ananda.
In the beginning of the following year, after receiving at the Sikkim Monastery in Rumtek, Sikkim (India), the transmission of Dham Ngakzod and Kagyu Ngakzod from His Eminence the XII Gyaltsab Rinpoche (transmissions that in 2007 he also received from His Eminence the XII Tai Situpa Rinpoche at the Sherab Ling Monastery at India), the Saya distributed some of these inestimable relics among Dharma centers of various countries.
In despite of it, and having in consideration the large number of relics that are still in his hands, the Saya has in view the construction at the Iberian Peninsula of at least three Pagodas –two of them at Madrid and Cataluña, respectively, and the last one at Portugal−, which could guard these sacred elements and which could last until the fifth millennium, when the teachings of the Gotama Buddha will be not learnt any more. In the process there should be obtained the official permits and there should be found the adequate land for it.
In 2011, the founder of Trikaya had diverse meetings, after which it was found an emplacement with the optimum conditions for constructing one of these Pagodas at San Lorenzo de El Escorial (Madrid), town with a famous monastery and which is declared as a World Heritage monument. The Pagodas will be built following the model of the Paranirvana Pagoda, used either in the countries adhered to the Mahayana School of Buddhism, as in the ones in which is practiced the Theravada Buddhism.
All those interested in taking part in this project with different kind of support –such as founds, construction materials, a carp etc.,− or with their voluntary work for constructing the Pagodas, can entry in contact with Trikaya trough the electronic address This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

In the Buddhist tradition, the Pagodas or Stupas are religious monuments in a shape of a conic tower, which are erected as symbols of peace and harmony and which, considered as sacred manifestations of a perfect mind, are the center of prayers and peregrinations of devotees and practitioners. For the benefit of all beings, the Pagodas also protect from the five great disasters of the war, the epidemic illness, the famine, the pollution and the poverty.
Erected in auspicious places, with an altruistic motivation and with specific designs and the right proportions, the Pagodas are built with selected materials, such stone, brick or concrete, and are painted in white, yellow and even gold color.
Among its architectonic features, it is remarkable the stone, concrete or marble platform over which they are based, around which the pilgrims make sacred circumvallation’s. On the top of this platform is erected the base of the Pagoda itself, which can be of square or octagonal design and which can have various steps. All the Pagodas have inside them, even at the base, a few sealed chambers, some of which are used as room for the meditation practice.
Over the platform is based a convex structure called Bumpa, which symbolizes the thirty one planes of existence and in which interior are put valuable objects that emanates the vital force of the body of the full Enlightened One, such as sacred texts, relics of great masters of the History or tsa-tsas, which are small molds of Pagodas which contain prayer rolls and which have been elaborated during the recitation of specific mantras.
In the Mahayana School, culminating the Pagoda is placed a conic tower, often of pyramidal style and of various levels of descendent size (normally thirteen), over which is placed a golden pinnacle in the shape of an umbrella. This is habitually crowed with a jewel that connotes the enlightenment, frequently with the shape of the moon –which symbolizes the Bodhiçitta motivation for the benefit of all beings− and the sun −which symbolizes the wisdom−. The consecration of the Pagoda culminates with its placement.
According to the tradition, the different steps which have to be followed in the process of the construction of the Pagodas begin with the election of an auspicious day and with the blessing with prayers and pujas of the selected ground. There have to be also prepared the recipients and the objects of value that these will contain. Following certain ceremonies, these containers will be deposited inside the Pagoda, which will be finally consecrated.
Although in the world there are thousands of Pagodas, raised either in Asiatic countries, as in different countries of the West, for the Buddhist tradition, and in particular for the Vajrayana Buddhism, eight are the Pagodas or Stupas that, due to their link with the life of the Buda, have the main role. These eight Pagodas are the Blowing Lotus of the Birth of Buddha Stupa, the Enlightenment Stupa, the Turn of the Wheel of Dharma and the Many Entrances of the Auspiciousness Stupa, the Great Miracle Stupa, the Descending from the Tushita heaven Stupa, the Reunification of the Sangha Stupa, the Victory Stupa and the Paranirvana Stupa, being the latter the most common one in the Theravada Buddhism countries.

Donations

pdfI would like to make donations to the following projects

Retreat Center

  • Pallars Center Workship and Retreat Center
  • Building a Pagoda at España

Social Projects

  • Hospital “Metta Aline” Ofhtalmology and General
  • Water in Myanmar

Publications

  • Printing and typesetting

Be a Volunteer

We hope the information of the Web page has introduced you to Trikaya and its functioning. Also we hope that you will share the joy of knowing Trikaya with all your friends and that you will invite them to join us in building a more tolerant society and a better world.

For volunteering opportunities in hospitals and schools in Myanmar, please contact:

volunteer@trikaya.es